"A Sanctuary in the City… Living Faith"

Sermons (Page 5)

Missed one of our inspirational services or maybe just need some positive direction today? We have our sermons available for you when you want them.

A Rule for Living Faith – With God

Psalm 63:1-9; Matthew 4:18-5:12 – Habits, routines, patterns, for good or not so good, they are conscious choices we make, at least at first. We shape our days, our preferences, our priorities. Which flavor? How much time do I need? Do I answer now or not? And after a while, we know they can turn into more thoughtless behaviors which shape who we are. How much time we spend. How we feel after we eat. How we really connect or slip into greater distance. We humans are creatures of habit. What matters are patterns we choose and priorities we pursue.

Take Us To Our Leader

Third Sunday after Epiphany; Matthew 12:9-23; 1 Chronicles 11:15-19 – Our nation has inaugurated a new president. The peaceful transfer of power – no small matter in this widely unsettled world – has been achieved yet again, keeping our 241 year run intact. And for this, we should all be deeply thankful. And yet, significant divisions remain among the citizenry. Some citizens are elated; others anxious. Some dismiss ongoing chaotic rhetoric as just words; others are fearful those words may become policy.

Seeing Stars

Epiphany Sunday; Isaiah 60:1-6; Matthew 2:1-12 – They sought complete fullness of Holy Love in human life. Emmanuel. Salvation. A Messiah for all society. Over the ages, we’ve embellished details of their spiritual quest with our interpretation and imagination. Three kings – Gaspar, Melchior, Balthazar, representing Persia, India, Arabia arriving on the 12th day after Jesus’ birth. From that distance their camels must have been turbo-charged!

Rev. Seth Weeldreyer

Love: A Promise Amid Complexities of Life

Fourth Sunday Advent; Isaiah 7:10-16; Matthew 1:18-25 – A central question throughout Matthew’s gospel is how can followers of Jesus fulfill Hebrew Law and yet live in response to ethical realities of their day. To be right with God, how do we nurture life as intended in scripture, yet interpreted relative to changing particularities of our time? Matthew frames the question with an ancestral lineage of faith, including many imperfect people, and unorthodox situations.

Joy: A Holy Gift for Every Heart

Third Sunday of Advent; Isaiah 35:1-10; Luke 1:39-55 – So, friends, how are we all doing on that little matter of Christmas gifts? Lots of ideas for techy toys or books or clothes or food? Delighted with progress in purchases or distracted by other events? Feeling behind and stressed? Calendar days flying by, possibilities running dry? Tis the season, when we want the perfect gift—to please a longing heart and bring a smile to beloved family, friends, or colleagues… Inasmuch as gifts try to express our love and nurture relationships, they are a good and meaningful part of the season. Tis the season … when expectations can increase the fun and satisfaction or by contrast, the frustration and even sadness.

A Glorious Harmony of Old

Second Sunday of Advent; Isaiah 11:1-10; Romans 15:4-13 – Friends, we cannot live without hope. It makes all the difference in how we observe our world, and how willingly, charitably we get to know and understand one another. It makes all the difference in situations we face, vitality we feel, choices we make. Different persons in similar circumstances—whether business success and honors achieved, or suffering amid such horrors as the Syrian war or concentration camps—different persons with similar challenges, abilities and opportunities will live in diverse even opposite ways, depending on whether there is hope or not.

Fearless Giving

21st Sunday after Pentecost; Mark 12:41-44; Luke 10:25-37 – It would be easy to romanticize this poor widow whom Jesus so heartily commends. It would be easy to see her poorly dressed, slipping up to something like the Salvation Army collection bucket at Christmas and plopping in her last two cents as we bystanders wait and watch, hoping for a happy ending like an O. Henry short story were she ends up being befriended and loved and provided for, happily ever after. It would be easy. And it would be wrong.